Wednesday, June 22, 2016

What I Read Wednesday

I finally remembered it's a Wednesday before the Wednesday is over! Summer vacation/busy day problems.

The Widow
Jean Taylor loves her husband Glen, even if he is a little controlling and a little by the book. Although Jean loves Glen, she also doesn't seem too sad at the beginning of the book when he's run over by a bus right in front of her. As the story unfolds, the reader learns that Glen was accused of having involvement in the case of a missing pre-schooler, named Bella. It seems, also, that Glen was found in possession of child pornography, despite his best attempts to convince Jean that it was a computer virus.
After Glen's death, Jean consents to give an interview--in the sense that she's too overwhelmed and polite to tell a reporter no. As the reporter fishes further in Jean and Glen's relationship and Bella's disappearance, it becomes evident that Jean may know more than she initially let on. Although this book was compared to The Girl on the Train, I didn't really see that connection--instead it was more of an in-depth look as to how far someone will go to maintain roles of normalcy and what happens when the breaking point appears.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here
It took me awhile to get into this book. Where Mikey lives, odd things happen. Zombies and vampires and, recently, mysterious blue lights in the woods that appear before indie kids die. Mikey's mom is running for a government position, causing him to live on edge and again become overwhelmed by his obsessive compulsive disorder. Meanwhile, his sister is praying to not have a resurgence of her eating disorder that plagued her during her mom's last campaign. Mikey is also in love with Henna, who seems content to friend zone him. There are secondary characters who play a part in this novel, as well, but I'll be honest, I struggled to find any attachment to them. I felt like this book tried to be a fantasy novel and a coming of age novel all at once and it seemed like it mostly missed the mark for me.

Girls on Fire: A Novel
So I enjoyed this novel for pure entertainment value. I didn't think it was the best book, but it had me engaged. My quibble with it was that I felt like the author was trying too hard for an unreliable narrator, but it felt like they were all unreliable and not in an engaging way. Following the suicide of a high school basketball star, quiet Hannah Dexter is befriended by the Kurt Cobain, grunge loving Lacey. Lacey claims that Hannah is a boring name and instead dubs her Dex. Although initially happy to see "Dex" making friends, Dex's parents eventually begin to question the type of power Lacey holds over her. After Lacey is sent to a Christian reform camp, Dex is befriended by Nikki, the popular queen bee of their school. Nikki has a past with Lacey that Dex is unaware of and as the story reaches its climax, it all comes to light. Few of the characters have any redeeming quality, particularly Dex who is content to become what others want her to be--regardless of the cost.

By Lisa Williamson The Art of Being Normal [Hardcover]
David is pretty sure his parents think he's gay, but David isn't gay. Rather, David feels that he is a girl trapped in a boy's body. With every inch taller he grows, David feels he's losing his grip on the only thing he's ever wanted. When David is being bullied in the cafeteria (a regular occurrence), new kid Leo comes to his defense. The two form an unlikely friendship and David finds the courage to tell Leo why he feels different, with unexpected results. Although David is the main character, Leo's story and motivations are equally as interesting. I love that a book like this exists and I hope it will reach its intended audience.

The Fireman: A Novel
With homage to Ray Bradbury, the author creates a novel that settles into a normal world that quickly becomes post-apocalyptic with the spread of a disease called Dragonscale or simply Scale. The infected are marked by a beautiful but eerie black pattern on their body. The eventual cause of death comes when they catch on fire and burn to death. Harper is a nurse who answers the call to treat infected patients, remaining clean herself until she too catches the Scale. In the midst of this, she discovers she is pregnant and vows to stay alive for the baby, but her husband Jakob becomes quickly unhinged and sees that the only answer is to kill Harper and possibly himself. Rescued by a mysterious man known only as The Fireman, Harper learns that their may be a way to live with the Dragonscale after all, but it won't be easy.
Loved this book so much. The storyline stuck with me for days afterward and I loved the resounding message found in many post-apocalyptic novels--as always, the real threat is not the disease or the monsters but the other humans.

I'm Thinking of Ending Things
This book had me so on edge that I ended up staying up late just to finish it in one reading. Jake and his girlfriend, never named, are going to meet Jake's parents. The entire time his girlfriend is thinking of ending things, but she isn't quite sure why. After an odd meeting with his parents, she is even more certain that she should end things. It's hard to discuss this book without giving anything away, but there are minute details that become more important as the book starts to reveal the true twist. I don't think this book will be for everyone, but if you enjoy psychological thrillers that leave you second guessing until the very end, I would recommend this one.

The Memory of Light
This was a sweet, albeit somewhat unbelievable book. Vicky Cruz wakes up at Lakeview hospital, disappointed to be alive after her nanny discovered that she tried to end her life. Through Dr. Desai and group therapy, Vicki meets and becomes intertwined with Mona, E.M. and Gabriel. I felt like the exploration of the loss and depression in the lives of these teens was realistic; however, the constant violation of HIPAA and disregard to patient safety was unrealistic. I wish the author would've stuck close to fact on those parts, but I still felt the characters and attitude toward depression and other mental illnesses was well done.

What are you reading?

4 comments:

Lyndsay W said...

I just finished The Nest. I thought it was great. A couple of friends had mentioned that they were disappointed in it, so I was almost surprised as I read it. (But now I've scrolled back and I see that you loved it too - I guess I should just listen to you.) ;)

Theresa Mahoney said...

I just read Brother and Tell Me 3 Things, both I believe were your recommendations. I really enjoyed both. Right now I am reading the Starbound trilogy. Not my favorite series, but not bad enough to shelve them and move on to something else.

One crazed mommy said...

Well - I wish I could say I've read a lot - I haven't even been able to check in for months. Hopefully I'll be able to read more soon - I've been on the same book for about 3 weeks now. It's meh...okay, but not great. In the past 3 months I think I've read 2 books - pretty sad. But...work has definitely played a large part in my reading time. I haven't even had a chance to go back and catch up on all my blogs - this is the first time I've been on since March. :\

Lyndsay W said...

I MISS THESE BY THE WAY